fbpx

6 Reasons Why A Tasmania Getaway Is The Ideal Eco-Escape

The complete guide to living sustainably in your city: Tassie eco-escape to Wineglass Bay

With international borders remaining closed for the foreseeable future, there’s never been a better time to explore Australia’s regional gems. Luckily for us, there’s no shortage of pristine wilderness begging to be discovered on your next Tasmania getaway.

A trip to Tassie is an absolute must for anyone looking for a regional escape that covers all bases. Think gourmet dining, cool climate wines and enough open-air adventure to keep you smiling long after you’ve landed. What’s more, Tassie is the first state in Australia to reach the milestone of providing its entire population with 100% renewable electricity.

If you’re planning a Tasmania getaway, we’ve got you covered with our top picks for the ultimate eco-escape.

Swim at Bay of Fires

Sustainable living guide: Tassie eco escape to Bay of Fires
Image credit: Lisa Kuilenburg

Australia as a whole is renowned for its stunning beaches, and you won’t be disappointed at Bay of Fires, known for its orange lichen-covered granite boulders, crystal clear waters and white sand. Bay of Fires is a popular conservation area, stretching from coast from Binalong Bay in the south to Eddystone Point in the north.

Settle in for the day at the area’s main beach, aforementioned Binalong Bay, for some swimming, sun-soaking, snorkelling or surfing, or find one of the many other small, more secluded beaches or inlets.  

Explore Cradle Mountain

Image credit: Tourism Tasmania and Jason Charles Hill

You’ll most likely be familiar with the name of this iconic World Heritage Area, as it’s one of the most-visited natural attractions in the state. With picturesque lakes, ambient rainforests and mountain peaks, there’s an array of scenery to make your Tasmania getaway one you won’t forget.

Hike on misty trails, spot Tasmanian devils, echidnas and wombats, visit scenic Lake St. Clair or stay a night (or three) in a lodge and lose yourself amongst these epic mountains — you’ll feel like you’re in another country altogether.  Beware of Tasmania’s unique climate when spending the day (or multiple) outdoors — the state is known for frequent rain and brisk temperatures all-year round.

Eat at The Agrarian Kitchen

Sustainable living guide: Tassie eco escape to The Agrarian Kitchen Eatery & Store
Image credit: Jarrad Seng

For a delicious and sustainable food experience, make sure you pay a visit to The Agrarian Kitchen Eatery. In 2008, Founders Rodney Dunn and Séverine Demanet started the Agrarian Kitchen Cooking School & Farm, created from a desire to connect back to the earth and to grow and cook authentic food with real ingredients. 

They then opened the eatery in 2017. The majority of its produce is sourced from local farmers, growers and fishermen, and they also use any excess produce from the cooking school’s farm and garden. Fruit and vegetables enter the kitchen with remnants of leaves and soil attached, meat as whole carcasses to be hung and broken down when required.

Any excess produce of the season is pickled, jammed, fermented, and cured in their dedicated preserving kitchen. Enjoy their seasonal menu and, if you want more, book yourself into a paddock to plate cooking class at the cooking school. 

Bushwalk through Freycinet National Park

Image credit: Matthew Donovan

A backdrop of sweeping mountains and white-sand beaches welcome you at Tasmania’s oldest national park, situated on the east coast. Get your fix of bushwalking here, with multiple trails on offer. Freycinet Peninsula Circuit is a 30 kilometre, three-day hike if you’ve got time up your sleeve and a decent pair of hiking boots. 

Otherwise, you can do the climb up to Wineglass Bay Lookout or stroll along the Cape Tourville boardwalk for 360 degree views. Keep your eyes peeled in the mountains and on the sea for glimpses of wildlife, including native birds, wallabies or even dolphins and whales at the right time of year. 

Stay in an Eco Lodge

Image courtesy of RACT Destinations

For a Tasmania getaway that blends luxury and sustainability then a visit to Freycinet Lodge is just the spot. Retreat to a peaceful, secluded stay just two and half hours out of Hobart. Nestled among the coastal wilderness of Coles Bay, the lodge offers a unique blend of natural simplicity and comfort.

Boasting a king bed configuration, outdoor bathtub, separate living area and deck, Freycinet Lodge’s pavilions are ideal for a romantic getaway to Tasmania’s spectacular east coast.

The lodge has been architecturally designed to blend harmoniously with the surrounding habitat. An ecologist, archaeologist, engineers and members of the aboriginal community were all consulted prior to its construction. No cranes were used — just human hands, trolleys and a slow and steady approach to ensure minimal environmental impact.

Taste wine from sustainable vineyards

Sustainable living guide: Tassie eco escape to Bay of Fires
Image credit: The Real Review

Pooley Wines is Tasmania’s first fully-accredited, environmentally certified sustainable vineyard, as well as also being the state’s first and only third-generation family winery. Located in Richmond (just a stone’s throw from Hobart airport), their cellar door is open daily from 10am — 5pm at the historic Belmont House property.

They’re praised for their sublime pinot noir and chardonnay here, but their riesling, cabernet merlot and gewurztraminer are all cracking, too. The team fires up the pizza oven from Friday to Sunday and there’s really nothing better than eating delicious woodfired pizza with a glass of pinot overlooking historic Richmond and the Coal River Valley.

Sample a mix of wines from both vineyards for just $5, then choose your favourite glass and pair it with a locally-sourced gourmet cheese plate to while away an afternoon.

Need more inspiration?

This Weekend is a sustainable living guide that’s good for people & the planet — offering  guides on slow travelsustainable diningconscious brands, wellness essentials, and more. Our platform promotes living sustainably without compromising the things that matter most.

No Comments Yet

Comments are closed